Thursday, August 25, 2016

LIVING in the MOMENT






Snaps of Real Life
Day 190 ~ Year 3
Team Zybko
August 25, 2016



















 


 


Snaps of Real Life
Day 190 ~ Year 3
Team Zybko
August 25, 2016

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Louisiana Flood




Snaps of Real Life
Day 189 ~ Year 3
Team Zybko
August 17, 2016

This week proved truly impossible to narrow down a snaps post to just 20 images. Honesty, I am still living in a foggy zone about this disaster that has hit our new community in Southern Louisiana. A cloud of gratefulness and guilt, wrestling around for the number one bold lettered headline of my heart.

Our new neighborhood of about 180 homes was spared from any devastating water damage. Like a newly formed island we have stood shoulder to shoulder, waiting, praying and hoping for the best.

The death toll is reported at 11 and the loss of homes more than 40,000. This was a few hours ago, it could be more than that by now.

 This is far from over.  As the many months ahead of rebuilding, throwing out swamped filled photo albums, favorite tennis shoes, heirlooms  and irreplaceable artwork will be overwhelmingly difficult for so many. 

I pray that these photos don't spark irritation in those that no longer have a street to play in puddles, mailboxes to receive mail, a car to drive to work or a living room furniture to relax on. 
I am truly sorry you were one them.

Instead, they should be reminder to many of us to count our blessings daily and to lift them up out of the water with encouragement, prayer and monetary donations. 

Those who are dry should help others not as fortunate.
As they would do for you.
Nothing is too little for those who now have nothing.

 These pictures with smiling faces and carrying on are just a snippet of new friends making the best of the situation during our purgatory wait of what is now being called an Historic Flood. 

The few people we know well enough to have cell numbers offered help within hours of the start of it all. One text went as follows;
If things get bad enough to evacuate, we have relatives on high ground. 

Louisiana people are doers, helpers and best friends to all. They live everyday by the whole love thy neighbor thing.
Disaster or not. 
  Because we are about as UN-Louisiana as we can be with no boat, big truck or knowledge of these small back roads we remained landlocked and stayed put for safety. Staying within an half mile radius of our front door, not venturing out farther than our bikes and/or common sense would take us.  

Looking back, it probably wasn't a super great idea to go frolicking into the swampy waters for obvious reasons many of you are thinking of right now. Bacteria, poisonous spiders and snakes, debris with nails and perhaps alligators to name a few. To their grandparents, please don't put it on my permanent record, I'm learning down here in the deep south too.